Book Review – “The Gospel According to Lost” By Chris Seay

I recently signed up to review books for Thomas Nelson Publishers via http://www.booksneeze.com.  This is my first review:

Buy this book at Amazon.com

In The Gospel According to Lost, Chris Seay explores the underlying religious themes of one of television's most popular and innovative shows.  He profiles the cast of characters (including a mass murderer, a korean mobster, a surgeon, a lottery winner, a con-man, and a African warlord to name a few) in such a way that the reader is challenged to see him/herself in both the heroes and the villains, ultimately pointing to the human condition and our need for a savior.  

I have been a dedicated fan of the show Lost from the very first episode, so with the start of the final season just days away I thought this would make for a fun read.  I was fun, but it was unexpectedly thought provoking as well. One of the recurring themes on Lost is the ongoing struggle between good and evil.  What often makes the show so interesting, however, is that the characters in Lost are not simply one-dimensional good guys and bad guys.  In fact, it is often difficult to distinguish from moment to moment who is good and who is not.  It is in this tension that Seay points the reader to his/her own brokenness and the goodness of God's grace.  While the character flaws of our favorite TV castaways are caricatured for the sake of story telling, what makes them so endearing is that in them we see ourselves. We too struggle with the good and bad parts of who we are, and apart from Jesus we are lost… as hopelessly stranded as our island friends.  But as Seay reminds us in his profile of Sawyer, the oft-shirtless, redneck, con-man, "Jesus knew what troubled beginnings were all about.  The miracle is that his love is extended to us in our angry, hateful, and shirtless state — not offered as a carrot on a stick for the person we might become."  

One thought on “Book Review – “The Gospel According to Lost” By Chris Seay

  1. “While the character flaws of our favorite TV castaways are caricatured for the sake of story telling, what makes them so endearing is that in them we see ourselves.”
    I scribbled many words that says something of the same as quoted, but I guessed that you explained far better than me (an average reader but an avid fan of LOST):)

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